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Quebecois Live Longest. Could it be the Poutine?

Deceased Data Factoid

In a world where the quest for longevity continues to captivate our attention, Canadians are a lucky bunch. According to the World Health Organization, Canada consistently ranks in the top 20 countries in the world in life expectancy. But Canada is a big and diverse country, with different regions facing their own unique challenges. We wondered: Where in Canada do people live the longest?

À votre santé!

According to data compiled from Cleanlist’s Canadian Deceased Registry, the average age at death for Canadian residents is 76.3 years. Not surprisingly, the retirement paradise of British Columbia boasts long lifespans, as its mild climate and beautiful scenery attract many older Canadians looking to live out their later years in comfort. But the top spot, with an age at death two years longer than the Canadian average, goes to Quebec. What is it about this province that contributes to the phenomenon of living longer? Let’s dive in and uncover the fascinating factors behind this.

A Balanced Lifestyle: Quebecers embrace a balanced approach to life, focusing on family, community, and personal well-being. The strong social support networks, tight-knit communities, and an emphasis on work-life balance all contribute to reduced stress levels and improved overall health.

Healthcare Access: Quebec’s strong and accessible healthcare system ensures that residents have access to top-notch medical services. Regular check-ups, early disease detection, and quality healthcare contribute to a longer and healthier life.

Active Lifestyle: The stunning natural landscapes of Quebec encourage an active lifestyle. Whether it’s skiing in the winter, hiking in the summer, or simply enjoying the outdoors year-round, physical activity is a cornerstone of Quebecois life.

Remote Struggles

Not all provinces are so lucky, however. In most of Atlantic and Northern Canada, the Canadian Deceased Registry reports shorter lifespans. What are the unique challenges faced by these regions that impact longevity?

Harsh Climate: Northern Canada’s extreme weather conditions pose physical challenges. Bitter cold, limited sunlight, and isolation can lead to difficulties in maintaining an active lifestyle and may contribute to health issues. Similarly, Atlantic Canada’s coastal areas are exposed to harsh weather and frequent storms, which can impact health and safety.

Limited Healthcare Access: In both regions, access to healthcare services can be limited due to remote locations and a scarcity of medical facilities. This can result in delayed medical care and less frequent health check-ups, leading to more advanced disease diagnoses.

Socioeconomic Factors: Lower income levels in certain areas of Atlantic and Northern Canada may limit access to healthy food, education, and employment opportunities, leading to higher rates of poverty and related health issues.

Living Life to the Fullest

In all, if you want to enjoy a long and healthy life, Canada is a great place to live. Understanding regional differences in longevity can inspire all Canadians to embrace a healthy lifestyle and to enjoy our beautiful and diverse country for many years to come.

But go easy on the poutine.

by Naomi Lewis, Cleanlist Product Specialist

About the data: The data presented in this report was summarized from the Canadian Deceased Registry, Canada’s only national registry of deceased Canadians. To learn more about the database or how to identify deceased people in your own customer data, contact sales@cleanlist.ca.

Cleanlist is Canada’s largest customer data company. We clean, enrich, and validate business and consumer data. We’re also experts in data-driven document composition and Canada’s largest data provider for digital and offline marketing. To learn more, visit us at Cleanlist.ca.

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